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openhouse-magazine-die-es-an-architects-home-Freunde-von-Freunden-Gwen-and-Gawie-Fagan-257-930x620 Die Es by Gwen & Gawie Fagan : Interview : Antonia Heil Photography: Desmond Louw & Antonia Heil  via freunde von freunden

Depending on where you stand, the Fagan’s self-built home ‘Die Es’ has a mountain or seaside backdrop. ‘Die Es’ – meaning ‘the hearth’ – is situated on the Atlantic Seaboard in Camps Bay, but it feels more like it’s on a little farm with its own private nature reserve. The house itself and most things in it are handmade by couple Gwen and Gawie Fagan, their son and three daughters. Today it’s just the two of them living here. It’s a magical place with magical people who have lived long and full lives.

Sitting around a table with Gwen and Gawie drinking a hot cup of Rooibos tea, we listen to a collection of stories experienced over almost a century. They speak about a career spanning almost 70 years, hard work and successes, and 65 years of marriage and family life.

As one of South Africa’s most celebrated architects, Gawie’s ideas concerning connecting architecture with the natural landscape were revolutionary. Over the years, Gwen played an instrumental role as a historical researcher and landscape planner in Gawie’s practice. Together they share a love of designing new buildings just as much as restoring old ones.

openhouse-magazine-die-es-an-architects-home-Freunde-von-Freunden-Gwen-and-Gawie-Fagan-225-930x618 Read More

openhouse-magazine-gropius-reinterpreted-not-reconstructed-bruno-fioretti-marquez-architects-dessau-text-florian-heilmeyer-photography-christoph-rokitta-lucia-moholy-nagy-gropius-silvia-holl-lena-bohn 1 “Gropius’ Ghosts. Bauhaus reinterpreted not reconstructed in Dessau” by Florian Heilmeyer via uncubemagazine.com, 2014

The two destroyed buildings of the original Walter Gropius-designed Bauhaus site, House Gropius and House Moholy-Nagy, have been recreated – well, sort of. Florian Heilmeyer explores the complicated, contested history and issues around the reconstruction…or rather recreation…or better still, reinterpretion of two iconic architectural ghosts from the past.

openhouse-magazine-gropius-reinterpreted-not-reconstructed-bruno-fioretti-marquez-architects-dessau-text-florian-heilmeyer-photography-christoph-rokitta-lucia-moholy-nagy-gropius-silvia-holl-lena-bohn 2 Read More

openhouse-magazine-up-on-high-architecture-casa-narigua-by-david-pedroza-castaneda-el-jonuco-mexico-photography-Sofia-Flores-Chapa 1 Casa Narigua by David Pedroza Castañeda : photography by Sofia Flores Chapa

via : plataforma arquitectura

mexican practice p+0 arquitectura has recently completed the narigua house in the mountains of northern mexico. in order to avoid eliminating trees from the heavily vegetated area, the concept of the home became centered around lifting it above the ground therefore leaving the ecosystem intact. three volumes are stacked upon one another, different shapes layered in different orientations forming dramatic cantilevers and subsequent terraces, viewpoints, and vertically-communicative spaces.  the home is cast in orthogonal exposed concrete tinted with soil from the site so as to become almost a geological incident rather than a man-made feat. the ground level plinth contains the garage right off the main road, storage rooms with furniture that could become guest bedrooms, and a mechanical room that frees the rooftop for a deck with 360-degree views. the next floor contains the main entrance area for visitors, the master suite, and the staircase leading down to the lower level. on top of everything, the kitchen, dining, and living areas enjoy the company of breathtaking scenery and access to one of many outdoor terraces, decks, and nooks- especially on the west side where two jagged peaks in the nearby distance almost touch. a delicate play between thickened walls, flat roofs, ethereal windows and heavy timber beams allow inhabitants to experience each face of every form while the glimpses of the external scenery become a fact of everyday life. the materials also recall an important vernacular in the region, however abstracted into modernity they may be. the house becomes an interactive sculpture whose planned spaces hold as much functionality and beauty as those in between.openhouse-magazine-up-on-high-architecture-casa-narigua-by-david-pedroza-castaneda-el-jonuco-mexico-photography-Sofia-Flores-Chapa 2 Read More

on-ground-level-architecture-house-in-balsthal-by-pascal-flammer-switzerland-photography-Ioana-Marinescu 1 house in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer photography by Ioana Marinescu

I think this is one of the most beautiful houses I have seen in a long time !! It’s simple form that seams to float above the land, and lets the people inside be one with the land.

This timber house is about different ways of perceiving the landscape surrounding it. There are two principal floors; one set 750mm below the earth, one 1500mm above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows. The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.

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cave-architecture-eto-kenta-nakatsu-oita-japan-photography-Noriyuki-Yano  1Cave by Eto Kenta : Photography by Noriyuki Yano all via Domus

This house, located in the northern part of Oita Prefecture, is situated in an area where residential construction has expanded to the southwest, and the vast countryside is left open on the north side. Against this environment, the openings and closings in the building form a relationship between the inside and outside worlds. The north-south axis is found in three locations at different heights and the large opening of about 7 mt joins together the north and south. To ensure adequate lighting, ventilation, and privacy to the indoor space, the opening on the south side was increased. In addition, by unifying the flooring, wooden fixtures and direction of the rail along an east-west axis it creates a growth in space and a sense of distance

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