openhouse magazine The second issue of OPENHOUSE magazine is out. If you haven’t seen it yet go to the web to find your nearest stockist or buy on-line. In this issue we talk to chef Jerome Waag in San Francisco, and we visit tara Steven’s cooking school in Fez, Labofem a plant shop in a home in Istanbul and Philip Johnson’s Glass House.

openhouse-magazine-a-forest-house-architecture-house-husaro-by-tham-videgard-arkitekter-sweden-photography-ake-E-son-Lindman 1House Husarö by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter photography by Ake E:son Lindman all via archdaily

The location is the outer Stockholm archipelago. Tall pines give the forested site an untouched character. The house is placed in a clearing with a high position in the landscape, on a plateau facing the sea in the north. The property has been in the family for a long time with a couple of small complementary buildings, a boathouse and a guesthouse, that has been used for vacation stays. As the family grew with a new generation, the need for a larger house with more space followed. The light conditions, the sea view and the flat and smooth bedrock were some of the qualities that constituted the starting point for the house. A relatively low budget also influenced the design, resulting in the idea to use tectonic rationality to support a specific spatial structure. The house, a pitched roof volume in two levels, is divided into an open social area at ground floor and a more private upper level, with bedrooms and a playroom. Within the square plan, a freestanding box holding kitchen, bathroom and the stair, organizes the ground floor into a sequence of interconnected spaces. Large sliding windows open up to the views in all directions and allow the sunlight to fill the interior. On the upper level a skylight that runs along the ridge of the roof underscores the verticality of space and subtly enhances the experience of seclusion. The exterior is entirely clad with folded black sheet metal of varied widths that integrate the position of the windows. Three glazed sliding doors with frames of hard wood provide entrances and direct access to the outdoor areas on the naturally flat part of the bedrock. All construction and finishes are made out of wood. The open plan is made possible with glulam wooden beams. Between these beams plywood sheets has been bent to form a series of vaults that add direction to the interior spaces.

openhouse-magazine-a-forest-house-architecture-house-husaro-by-tham-videgard-arkitekter-sweden-photography-ake-E-son-Lindman 2 Read More

openhouse-magazine-die-es-an-architects-home-Freunde-von-Freunden-Gwen-and-Gawie-Fagan-257-930x620 Die Es by Gwen & Gawie Fagan : Interview : Antonia Heil Photography: Desmond Louw & Antonia Heil  via freunde von freunden

Depending on where you stand, the Fagan’s self-built home ‘Die Es’ has a mountain or seaside backdrop. ‘Die Es’ – meaning ‘the hearth’ – is situated on the Atlantic Seaboard in Camps Bay, but it feels more like it’s on a little farm with its own private nature reserve. The house itself and most things in it are handmade by couple Gwen and Gawie Fagan, their son and three daughters. Today it’s just the two of them living here. It’s a magical place with magical people who have lived long and full lives.

Sitting around a table with Gwen and Gawie drinking a hot cup of Rooibos tea, we listen to a collection of stories experienced over almost a century. They speak about a career spanning almost 70 years, hard work and successes, and 65 years of marriage and family life.

As one of South Africa’s most celebrated architects, Gawie’s ideas concerning connecting architecture with the natural landscape were revolutionary. Over the years, Gwen played an instrumental role as a historical researcher and landscape planner in Gawie’s practice. Together they share a love of designing new buildings just as much as restoring old ones.

openhouse-magazine-die-es-an-architects-home-Freunde-von-Freunden-Gwen-and-Gawie-Fagan-225-930x618 Read More

openhouse-magazine-gropius-reinterpreted-not-reconstructed-bruno-fioretti-marquez-architects-dessau-text-florian-heilmeyer-photography-christoph-rokitta-lucia-moholy-nagy-gropius-silvia-holl-lena-bohn 1 “Gropius’ Ghosts. Bauhaus reinterpreted not reconstructed in Dessau” by Florian Heilmeyer via, 2014

The two destroyed buildings of the original Walter Gropius-designed Bauhaus site, House Gropius and House Moholy-Nagy, have been recreated – well, sort of. Florian Heilmeyer explores the complicated, contested history and issues around the reconstruction…or rather recreation…or better still, reinterpretion of two iconic architectural ghosts from the past.

openhouse-magazine-gropius-reinterpreted-not-reconstructed-bruno-fioretti-marquez-architects-dessau-text-florian-heilmeyer-photography-christoph-rokitta-lucia-moholy-nagy-gropius-silvia-holl-lena-bohn 2 Read More

openhouse-magazine-up-on-high-architecture-casa-narigua-by-david-pedroza-castaneda-el-jonuco-mexico-photography-Sofia-Flores-Chapa 1 Casa Narigua by David Pedroza Castañeda : photography by Sofia Flores Chapa

via : plataforma arquitectura

mexican practice p+0 arquitectura has recently completed the narigua house in the mountains of northern mexico. in order to avoid eliminating trees from the heavily vegetated area, the concept of the home became centered around lifting it above the ground therefore leaving the ecosystem intact. three volumes are stacked upon one another, different shapes layered in different orientations forming dramatic cantilevers and subsequent terraces, viewpoints, and vertically-communicative spaces.  the home is cast in orthogonal exposed concrete tinted with soil from the site so as to become almost a geological incident rather than a man-made feat. the ground level plinth contains the garage right off the main road, storage rooms with furniture that could become guest bedrooms, and a mechanical room that frees the rooftop for a deck with 360-degree views. the next floor contains the main entrance area for visitors, the master suite, and the staircase leading down to the lower level. on top of everything, the kitchen, dining, and living areas enjoy the company of breathtaking scenery and access to one of many outdoor terraces, decks, and nooks- especially on the west side where two jagged peaks in the nearby distance almost touch. a delicate play between thickened walls, flat roofs, ethereal windows and heavy timber beams allow inhabitants to experience each face of every form while the glimpses of the external scenery become a fact of everyday life. the materials also recall an important vernacular in the region, however abstracted into modernity they may be. the house becomes an interactive sculpture whose planned spaces hold as much functionality and beauty as those in between.openhouse-magazine-up-on-high-architecture-casa-narigua-by-david-pedroza-castaneda-el-jonuco-mexico-photography-Sofia-Flores-Chapa 2 Read More


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