openhouse-magazine-the-perfect-table-furniture-muller-van-severen-belgium-tableS+first-chairs_2

With both Fien Muller and Hannes Van Severen being artists, it’s natural that the collection sits somewhere between design and art – it’s obviously ‘furniture’ but the emphasis is not completely concentrated on function and suggests different ways of living and use of space… an uncanny twist on universal forms. Fien Muller’s photography is suggestive of someone who considers everything in her daily life to be up for participation in the theatre of her compositions – whether choosing her characters from the woodpile, scavenging Hannes’ offcuts or realising the sculptural aspect of a skinned eel, nothing escapes the pot. It seems it’s not so much the qualities of an individual object that are important, but what happens when that object is introduced to another. Her sense of colour is extraordinary in the same way, with quite odd combinations – sometimes subtle, sometimes glaringly opposing, but always with a harmonious result. Fien’s interest in the material is also apparent in her art works, as below with the contrast in texture of the hand chopped wood and the plastic wood effect. It’s not necessary to ask why she has selected these elements to sit together but these incongruous objects are somehow compatible and appropriate. The work of Hannes is often the other way around – with the familiar becoming absurd, in the sense that it loses it’s function and turns irrational. A staircase laid on its side goes nowhere and a closet run through the circular saw loses its balance. The everyday is turned on its head and apparent function negated. The inspiration of their art world is readily seen in the furniture collection with forms reminiscent of Donald Judd or Sol Lewitt but with the humour that comes with collaborations such as that of Fischli & Weiss, who also created from the commonplace and familiar. There is wit in both artists’ work which follows into their furniture collection – two shelving units become entangled and inseperable, two people are forced into conversation by a double seat or the colour range might be dependent on the health and safety colour-coding of a chopping board manufacturer. Its hard to not be reminded of the self-taught, experimental and collaborative Jean Prouvé, who also didn’t work within the constraints of a particular discipline. The feeling you get is of the creators living their lives with the ‘work’ being an equal and necessary aspect of human existence alongside sitting, eating, reading, talking… The Muller Van Severen collection invites participation – the chopping boards and trivets are wall sculptures that adapt to a functional role and change in appearance with use; the double facing seat only achieves its potential with use – two people engaging and perhaps forming new ideas, flirting or just sharing a bit of banter. In this instance, the process of ‘designing’ appears to be more like a conversation and an evolution of ideas, with one finished product inspiring the next – hence the collection working so well as a whole. Working as a duo obviates the individual ego all too prevalent in both the design and art world and allows each object to just exist. The distinction between art and design narrows when the intention of the creators is not to produce one or the other, but to just create and live, and certainly not for the sake of becoming a name to look out for… although, whether through choice or not, this has become the case for both Fien Muller and Hannes Van Severen.

Text: Jonathan Barrie photos and text via Mulle Van Severen

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openhouse-magazine-hanging-around-art-suspended-stone-circle-ii-by-ken-unsworth-australia 1 For many years, Australian-based artist Ken Unsworth has made viewers hold their breath with his timeless work entitledSuspended Stone Circle II. The installation was first completed in 1974 and produced again in 1988, and is awe-inspiring in both its fragility and volume. Unsworth used 103 river stones each weighing about 33 pounds and bound them together by three sets of wires that were tied to rings and secured to the ceiling. They form a suspended disc, with each element resting perfectly in its place. The sculptor hung the stones so that their center of gravity falls on the central axis of the disc, and each stone is equal distance from one another. As they remain in midair, their cone-shaped stabilizing wires mimic a force field, and it’s almost as if they are held up by this energy. Unsworth’s installation is peaceful, balanced, and even a little nerve wracking – at any moment, the work could theoretically come tumbling down. Unsworth first gained popularity as a sculptor in the 1970’s when he combined performance art with minimalist forms. In addition to stones, the artist has created other monumental works, including a piece titled Rapture, where a grand piano is formed into a large set of stairs. text and photos via : my modern met 

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openhouse-magazine-up-on-high-architecture-casa-narigua-by-david-pedroza-castaneda-el-jonuco-mexico-photography-Sofia-Flores-Chapa 1 Casa Narigua by David Pedroza Castañeda : photography by Sofia Flores Chapa

via : plataforma arquitectura

mexican practice p+0 arquitectura has recently completed the narigua house in the mountains of northern mexico. in order to avoid eliminating trees from the heavily vegetated area, the concept of the home became centered around lifting it above the ground therefore leaving the ecosystem intact. three volumes are stacked upon one another, different shapes layered in different orientations forming dramatic cantilevers and subsequent terraces, viewpoints, and vertically-communicative spaces.  the home is cast in orthogonal exposed concrete tinted with soil from the site so as to become almost a geological incident rather than a man-made feat. the ground level plinth contains the garage right off the main road, storage rooms with furniture that could become guest bedrooms, and a mechanical room that frees the rooftop for a deck with 360-degree views. the next floor contains the main entrance area for visitors, the master suite, and the staircase leading down to the lower level. on top of everything, the kitchen, dining, and living areas enjoy the company of breathtaking scenery and access to one of many outdoor terraces, decks, and nooks- especially on the west side where two jagged peaks in the nearby distance almost touch. a delicate play between thickened walls, flat roofs, ethereal windows and heavy timber beams allow inhabitants to experience each face of every form while the glimpses of the external scenery become a fact of everyday life. the materials also recall an important vernacular in the region, however abstracted into modernity they may be. the house becomes an interactive sculpture whose planned spaces hold as much functionality and beauty as those in between.openhouse-magazine-up-on-high-architecture-casa-narigua-by-david-pedroza-castaneda-el-jonuco-mexico-photography-Sofia-Flores-Chapa 2 Read More

on-ground-level-architecture-house-in-balsthal-by-pascal-flammer-switzerland-photography-Ioana-Marinescu 1 house in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer photography by Ioana Marinescu

I think this is one of the most beautiful houses I have seen in a long time !! It’s simple form that seams to float above the land, and lets the people inside be one with the land.

This timber house is about different ways of perceiving the landscape surrounding it. There are two principal floors; one set 750mm below the earth, one 1500mm above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows. The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.

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my friend Adolfo Abejon has designed this beautiful porcilain lamp that easily fits to any hanging cable lamp and gives a beautiful soft glow. Venice is a porcelain lampshade that quickly turns a simple ceiling light point into a luminaire. Just secure the small safety part onto the wire by adjusting the set screw and place the lampshade over it. This way you will enjoy warm, diffuse light anywhere in your home.

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cave-architecture-eto-kenta-nakatsu-oita-japan-photography-Noriyuki-Yano  1Cave by Eto Kenta : Photography by Noriyuki Yano all via Domus

This house, located in the northern part of Oita Prefecture, is situated in an area where residential construction has expanded to the southwest, and the vast countryside is left open on the north side. Against this environment, the openings and closings in the building form a relationship between the inside and outside worlds. The north-south axis is found in three locations at different heights and the large opening of about 7 mt joins together the north and south. To ensure adequate lighting, ventilation, and privacy to the indoor space, the opening on the south side was increased. In addition, by unifying the flooring, wooden fixtures and direction of the rail along an east-west axis it creates a growth in space and a sense of distance

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openhouse-magazine-blog-whats-left-of-utopia-photography-julien-mauve-abandoned-landscapes 1 I fell in love with the beautiful haunting images by french photographer Julien Mauve.

“This project acknowledges an impoverished landscape and loss of space due to the inhumanity of the structures we choose to build. In this mixture of grief and hope, the characters appear on the point of disappearing within the fog that engulfs those urban utopias, considered at the time of construction to be symbols of progress. Disembodied witnesses, they become actors in a play of which the ending is uncertain”

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